The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
    Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne
   
 
  Jul 28, 2017
 
 
    
Skip Navigation
2015-2016 Undergraduate Bulletin [Archived Catalog]

Part 2: General Education Requirements


Click on a link to be taken to the entry below.

Category A: Foundational Intellectual Skills 

1. Written Communication (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

2. Speaking and Listening (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

3. Quantitative Reasoning (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

Category B: Ways of Knowing

4. Scientific Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

5. Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

6. Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

7. Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved course) The remaining 9 credit hours of the state-mandated general education should be taken by students from among the approved courses in Categories A and B as needed to fulfill their remaining state-mandated outcomes and as works best for their programs/majors.

Category C. Capstone

8. Capstone Experience (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in an approved course)

Subject Area Abbreviation Key

Course List
 

Principles of General Education

General Education ensures students will be familiar with the important modes of human thought that are the foundations of science, philosophy, art and social behavior. General Education helps students understand the traditions that have informed one’s own and other cultures of the world. It requires that students consider the nature and diversity of individuals, cultures and societies around the world, and gain appreciation of the natural systems in which these individuals, cultures and societies exist.

General Education at IPFW defines an integrated pedagogical framework that offers both substantive knowledge and an appreciation of multiple methods of inquiry and learning. Individual courses satisfy specific learning outcomes. The overall goals of the General Education program are achieved through cumulative course work. Individual courses should provide a basis for life-long learning, allow students to gain both substantive knowledge and an appreciation of method, and be appropriate for non-majors and for students who are unlikely to take another course in the discipline. This requirement does not preclude the possibility that the course might also be appropriate for majors.

Students who complete the General Education requirements at IPFW are expected to:

  • Read, write, and speak with comprehension, clarity, and precision in appropriate media. Reason quantitatively.
  • Identify substantive knowledge and disciplinary methods and critically evaluate ideas. Demonstrate an ability to use information literacy skills.
  • Demonstrate an ability to think critically and solve problems. Understand the traditions that form one’s own and other cultures.
  • Be familiar with modes of human thought that are the foundations of science, philosophy, art and social behavior.
  • Understand aspects of the natural world.
  • Use acquired knowledge and skills to create new scholarship.

Categorical Framework

The Statewide Transfer General Education Core for associate and bachelor degree programs at IPFW shall consist of 30 credits, distributed as indicated, in areas 1-3 of category A, areas 4-7 of category B, and all the enumerated competencies 1.1-6.7 or 1.1-7.4, as defined thereunder.

All students completing a bachelor degree program at IPFW must also complete category C: Capstone.

A student who completes requirements in categories A and B with a grade of C- or better shall have completed the Statewide Transfer General Education Core, and this achievement shall be noted on the student’s transcript. A student transferring to IPFW with a similar notation from another college or university shall be exempt from additional requirements in categories A and B.

A. Foundational Intellectual Skills

1. Written Communication (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

2. Speaking and Listening (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

3. Quantitative Reasoning (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

B. Ways of Knowing

4. Scientific Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

5. Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

6. Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved courses)

7. Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in approved course) The remaining 9 credit hours of the state-mandated general education should be taken by students from among the approved courses in Categories A and B as needed to fulfill their remaining state-mandated outcomes and as works best for their programs/majors.

C. Capstone

8. Capstone Experience (at least 3 cr and all outcomes in an approved course)


Students who entered IPFW for the first time in fall 1995 or a subsequent term in a bachelor’s degree program, or transferred into a new bachelor’s degree program, are required to satisfy IPFW’s general education program as part of their degree requirements. The courses listed below may be used to satisfy these requirements. The student’s advisor will know of any courses that have been added to this list.

Students should check specific college, school or division requirements to determine if any special conditions about general education apply to their major. Under certain circumstances, students may be allowed to substitute courses for those listed below. An academic advisor will explain the procedure for requesting a substitution.

A student must earn a grade of C- or better in each course used to satisfy the IPFW general education requirements.

The general education Web site is www.ipfw.edu/offices/oaa/programs/genedprograms.html

See the Subject Area Abbreviation Key at the end of this section to determine the subject area under which the course falls, (e.g., ENG W131 falls under English)


Learning Outcomes for Categories A and B

Category A: Foundational Intellectual Skills

Linguistic and numerical foundations are requisite to thinking and communicating critically and creatively. Foundational skills help students to speak and write precisely, clearly, and persuasively; read and listen actively and with comprehension; and reason quantitatively as a means of drawing reliable conclusions. These skills are fundamental, and courses in category A are best completed in each student’s first 30 credits of enrollment.

1. Written Communication

Upon completion of the Written Communication competency, students will be able to:

1.1. Produce texts that use appropriate formats, genre conventions, and documentation styles while controlling tone, syntax, grammar, and spelling.

1.2. Demonstrate an understanding of writing as a social process that includes multiple drafts, collaboration, and reflection.

1.3. Read critically, summarize, apply, analyze, and synthesize information and concepts in written and visual texts as the basis for developing original ideas and claims.

1.4. Demonstrate an understanding of writing assignments as a series of tasks including identifying and evaluating useful and reliable outside sources.

1.5. Develop, assert and support a focused thesis with appropriate reasoning and adequate evidence.

1.6. Compose texts that exhibit appropriate rhetorical choices, which include attention to audience, purpose, context, genre, and convention.

1.7. Demonstrate proficiency in reading, evaluating, analyzing, and using material collected from electronic sources (such as visual, electronic, library databases, Internet sources, other official databases, federal government databases, reputable blogs, wikis, etc.).

2. Speaking and Listening

Upon completion of the Speaking and Listening competency, students will be able to:

2.1. Use appropriate organization or logical sequencing to deliver an oral message.

2.2. Adapt an oral message for diverse audiences, contexts, and communication channels.

2.3. Identify and demonstrate appropriate oral and nonverbal communication practices.

2.4. Advance an oral argument using logical reasoning.

2.5. Provide credible and relevant evidence to support an oral argument.

2.6. Demonstrate the ethical responsibilities of sending and receiving oral messages.

2.7. Summarize or paraphrase an oral message to demonstrate comprehension.

3. Quantitative Reasoning

Upon completion of the Quantitative Reasoning competency, students will be able to:

3.1. Interpret information that has been presented in mathematical form (e.g. with functions, equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words, geometric figures).

3.2. Represent information/data in mathematical form as appropriate (e.g. with functions, equations, graphs, diagrams, tables, words, geometric figures).

3.3. Demonstrate skill in carrying out mathematical (e.g. algebraic, geometric, logical, statistical) procedures flexibly, accurately, and efficiently to solve problems.

3.4. Analyze mathematical arguments, determining whether stated conclusions can be inferred.

3.5. Communicate which assumptions have been made in the solution process.

3.6. Analyze mathematical results in order to determine the reasonableness of the solution.

3.7. Cite the limitations of the process where applicable.

3.8. Clearly explain the representation, solution, and interpretation of the math problem.

Category B: Ways of Knowing

4. Scientific Ways of Knowing

Natural science is a knowledge domain transcending the human experience. Students should understand the role of observation and inference in investigations; how natural science theories are formed, tested, and validated; the limitations inherent to natural scientific inquiry; and the impact of science and mathematics upon intellectual history. Courses in this way of knowing foster scientific thinking; knowledge of the physical and natural world; and relativizes humanity’s position within the universe.

Upon completion of the Scientific competency, students will be able to:

4.1. Explain how scientific explanations are formulated, tested, and modified or validated.

4.2 Distinguish between scientific and non‐scientific evidence and explanations.

4.3 Apply foundational knowledge and discipline‐specific concepts to address issues or solve problems

4.4 Apply basic observational, quantitative, or technological methods to gather data and generate evidence-based conclusions.

4.5 Use current models and theories to describe, explain, or predict natural phenomena.

4.6 Locate reliable sources of scientific evidence to construct arguments related to real-world issues.

5. Social and Behavioral Ways of Knowing

Students must understand the nature and diversity of individuals, cultures and societies around the world. An exploration of behavioral, societal and cultural processes utilizing the application of scientific methodologies forms the basis for that understanding. This understanding of diverse systems assists the student in overcoming provincialism; in developing the willingness, confidence, and sense of responsibility for making informed decisions; and in acquiring the ability to assess personal behavior and that of others. Such learning requires an historical consciousness; familiarity with components of social structure and social institutions; knowledge of basic behavioral processes; comprehension of the interplay among ideas, technology, and social organization; and appreciation of the complex dimensions of personal and institutional rules.

Upon completion of the Social and Behavioral competency, students will be able to:

5.1 Demonstrate knowledge of major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical patterns, or historical contexts within a given social or behavioral domain.

5.2 Identify the strengths and weaknesses of contending explanations or interpretations for social, behavioral, or historical phenomena.

5.3 Demonstrate basic literacy in social, behavioral, or historical research methods and analyses.

5.4 Evaluate evidence supporting conclusions about the behavior of individuals, groups, institutions, or organizations.

5.5 Recognize the extent and impact of diversity among individuals, cultures, or societies in contemporary or historical contexts.

5.6 Identify examples of how social, behavioral, or historical knowledge informs and can shape personal, ethical, civic, or global decisions and responsibilities.

6. Humanistic and Artistic Ways of Knowing

Humanistic thought is the attempt to resolve such abiding issues as the meaning of life, the role
of the arts in our understanding of what it is to be human, and the limits of knowledge. Humanistic inquiry assesses-across temporal, cultural, disciplinary, and theoretical divisions- how humans view themselves in relation to other humans, to nature, and to the divine. Studies in the humanities offer students the intellectual resources to develop mature self-concepts and heightened social consciousness.

Upon completion of the Humanistic and Artistic competency, students will be able to:

6.1 Recognize and describe humanistic, historical, or artistic works or problems and patterns of the human experience.

6.2 Apply disciplinary methodologies, epistemologies, and traditions of the humanities and the arts, including the ability to distinguish primary and secondary sources.

6.3 Analyze and evaluate texts, objects, events, or ideas in their cultural, intellectual or historical contexts.

6.4 Analyze the concepts and principles of various types of humanistic or artistic expression.

6.5 Create, interpret, or reinterpret artistic and/or humanistic works through performance or criticism.

6.6 Develop arguments about forms of human agency or expression grounded in rational analysis and in an understanding of and respect for spatial, temporal, and cultural contexts.

6.7 Analyze diverse narratives and evidence in order to explore the complexity of human experience across space and time.
 

7. Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing

True scholarship necessarily involves the creation of a deeper understanding about nature and/or the human experience. This understanding is sometimes achieved through a traditional academic approach and sometimes through performance and art. Scholarship cannot always be compartmentalized into a single way of knowing, and performance is inherently based upon a broad experience of life and the world around us.

A student will complete a broadly interdisciplinary course, or will complete a course having a significant experiential, integrative and/or creative performance.

Option 1: Upon completion of the Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing using a broadly interdisciplinary course, students will be able to:

Meet any three learning outcomes from 1.1 to 3.8 of the Category A foundation areas and any two outcomes from each of two different areas selected from areas 4-6 under Category B: Ways of Knowing.

Option 2: Upon completion of the Interdisciplinary Ways of Knowing using an experiential, integrative and/or creative performance, students will be able to:

7.1 Demonstrate an understanding of the creative process using the vocabulary of the appropriate discipline.

7.2 Perform or create a work of personal expression and bring the work to fruition using applicable skills.

7.3 Articulate a reflective and critical evaluation of their own and other’s creative efforts using written and/or oral communication.

7.4 At least two additional learning outcomes selected from 1.1-6.7.

Learning Outcomes for Category C: Capstone

In addition to the 30 credit transfer core, all IPFW Bachelor’s Degree candidates are expected to complete an approved three credit capstone course at the 300 level or higher. The Capstone course reflects the faculty commitment to the acquisition and application of knowledge as fundamental to the baccalaureate degree, and allows flexibility and innovation in Capstone course creation.

All capstone projects will involve the acquisition or application of knowledge. This should be broadly construed and may include the exploration of any discipline-specific scholarship including the scholarly activities typically associated with the professional schools, service professions, engineering and the performing arts. A capstone may center on any aspect of university life as long as its primary focus is on the acquisition or application of knowledge. The project may involve a formal service learning experience, or a formal international study experience as its primary focus.

All capstone projects, including those in the performing arts, shall produce a significant product in a discipline-appropriate format, demonstrating the scholarly methods, techniques and conventions associated with the discipline.

Upon completion of the Capstone, students will be able to:

8.1. Produce an original work involving the creation or application of knowledge, performance or service.

8.2. Report the results of original work through a discipline-appropriate product.

8.3. Demonstrate a high level of personal integrity and professional ethics by understanding the ethical responsibilities related to the profession associated with the subject of the capstone project.

8.4. Demonstrate critical-thinking abilities and familiarity with quantitative and/or qualitative reasoning.


 General Education Courses

Students must earn a grade of C- or better in each course used to satisfy the IPFW general education requirements.

Category A Courses: Foundational Intellectual Skills  

Category B Courses: Ways of Knowing  

Category C Courses: Capstone  
 




Subject Area Abbreviation Key

 

 

A&AE
ACE
ACS
AFRO
AGR
AGRY
AHLT
AMST
ANSC
ANTH
ARET
AST
BCHM
BIOL
BUFW
BUS
CDFS
CE
CET
CFS
CHE
CHM
CIMT
CLAS
CMLT
CNET
COAS
COM
CPET
CPT
CS
CSD
CSR
DANC
DAST
DHYG
DLTP
EALC
ECE
ECET
ECON
EDUA
EDUC
ENG
ENGR
ENTM
ET
ETCS
FILM
FINA
FNN
FNR
FOLK
FREN
FWAS
GEOG
GEOL
GER
GERN
HIST
HON
HORT
HPER
HSC
HSCI
HSRV
HTM
HUMA
IDIS
IE
IET
ILCS
IM
INTL
INTR
IST
IT
ITC
JOUR
LBST
LGBT
LING
LSTU
LTAM
MA
ME
MET
MSE
MSL
MIL
MUS
NELC
NUR
OLS
PACS
PCTX
PHIL
PHYS
POLS

PPOL
PSY
REL
SE
SLAV
SLIS
SOC
SPAN
STAT
SWK
TECH
THTR
VCD
VICT
VM
WOST

 

Aerodynamics and Aeronautical Engineering
Adult Continuing Education
Applied Computer Science
Afro-American Studies
Agriculture
Agronomy
Allied Health
American Studies
Animal Sciences
Anthropology
Architectural Engineering Technology
Astronomy
Biochemistry
Biology
Business-Fort Wayne
Business
Child Development and Family Studies
Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering Technology
Consumer and Family Sciences
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Computer-Integrated Manufacturing Technology
Classical Studies
Comparative Literature
Construction Engineering Technology
Arts and Sciences-General
Communication
Computer Engineering Technology
Computer Technology
Computer Science
Communication Sciences & Disorders
Consumer Sciences and Retailing
Dance
Dental Assisting
Dental Hygiene
Dental Lab Technology
East Asian Language and Culture (Chinese)
Electrical Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
Economics
Education
Education
English
Engineering
Entomology
Engineering Technology
Engineering Technology and Computer Science
Film Studies
Fine Arts
Foods and Nutrition
Forestry and Natural Resources
Folklore
French
Fort Wayne Arts and Sciences
Geography
Geology
German
Gerontology
History
Honors
Horticulture
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation
Health Sciences
Health Sciences
Human Services
Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism Management
Humanities
Interdisciplinary Studies and Honors
Industrial Engineering
Industrial Engineering Technology
International Language and Culture Studies
Informatics
International Studies
Interior Design
Information Systems and Technology
Industrial Technology
Information Technology and Computers
Journalism
Liberal Studies
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender
Linguistics
Labor Studies
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Materials Engineering
Military Science and Leadership
Military Science and Leadership
Music
Near East Language and Culture
Nursing
Organizational Leadership and Supervision
Peace and Conflict Studies
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Public Policy
Psychology
Religious Studies
Systems Engineering
Slavic Languages (Russian)
Library and Information Science
Sociology
Spanish
Statistics
Social Work
Technology
Theatre
Visual Communication and Design
Victorian Studies
Veterinary
Women’s Studies